Category: Why

Knowing why OVER knowing what

What does it mean to know why over what? What I do A focus on “what” we do creates many problems. It’s easy, though. It’s the first thing that comes to mind. I write code. I test. I gather requirements. I manage projects. Unfortunately, when we do this, it’s easy to lose sight of why

Working with OVER working for

What does it mean to work with a client as opposed to working for one? Handling Unknowns Consider a situation when there is a question or some uncertainty about how to solve a client issue, what does the conversation look like? Is it just you? Does the delivery team have a meeting? Do a few

Why Manifesto

Because people in software like “manifestos”, try this as a litmus test for the decisions to make sure you’re thinking about value and not just staying busy.  As in the agile manifesto, the things on the right have value, but not as much as the things on the left. Working WITH clients OVER working FOR clients Knowing why OVER knowing what

The Why of Lean

Conventional lean tools include timing a process and tagging each action as value added or waste. That may work in a factory, but not in software development; or can it? The same precision and clarity is not possible in a knowledge industry. You cannot apply a stop watch to mental problem solving. Sometimes getting away

Optimum Busyness

Recently, I’ve said a lot of bad things about “busyness”.  I stand behind all of them, but that does not mean that the way to be agile and lean is to do nothing.   It is not true that just because you’re doing something that you’re delivering value.  It is also true that you must

Why > Busy

Earlier, we talked about how busyness works against agile & lean.  Today, we’ll look at how to replace busyness with value delivery (the heart of agile & lean). Given that busyness has been framed as the enemy, you may be thinking:  That sounds great, but there are still salaries being paid and clients expect results;

The Prime Waste – Busyness

There is a common feeling that indicates the presence of all 8 wastes. It was best described by my former leader when he summarized what team members were telling him: I’m too busy doing my job, to do my job. By taking a step back, it becomes obvious how constant busyness undermines the business by inviting all 8